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Yerevan, Capital of Armenia

Yerevan, Armenia’s capital, is marked by grand Soviet-era architecture. The Matenadaran library, housing thousands of ancient Greek and Armenian manuscripts, dominates its main avenue. Republic Square is the city’s core, with musical water fountains and colonnaded government buildings. The 1920s History Museum of Armenia on the square’s eastern side contains archaeological objects like a circa-3500-B.C. leather shoe.
Also on Republic Square is the National Gallery, displaying European, Russian, Asian and Armenian artwork. To the north is the Cascade, a monumental grass-covered stone stairway. At its top is Victory Park, featuring an amusement park and cafes. Near its bottom is the amphitheaterlike Opera Theater concert hall and Lovers’ Park, which has waterfalls and outdoor concerts. To the west is the 18th-century Blue Mosque, distinguished by its mosaic tiles. The Genocide Museum, on a western hill overlooking Mount Ararat, recounts the massacre of Armenians under Ottoman rule.

Lake Sevan

Lake Sevan is a large, high-altitude lake in eastern Armenia. It’s known for its beaches. Set on a narrow peninsula, the Sevanavank Monastery has 2 stone churches dating to the 9th century. To the south, Hayravank Monastery overlooks the lake from a rocky outcrop. Noratus Cemetery has hundreds of carved stone khachkar memorials. Odzaberd is a ruined fortress built by the Urartian civilization in the 8th century BC.

Etchmiadzin Cathedral, Vagharshapat

Is the 4th-largest city in Armenia and the most populous municipal community of Armavir Province, located about 18 km west of the capital Yerevan, and 10 km north of the closed Turkish-Armenian border. It is commonly known as Ejmiatsin, which was its official name between 1945 and 1995. It is still commonly used colloquially and in official bureaucracy. The city is best known as the location of Etchmiadzin Cathedral and Mother See of Holy Etchmiadzin, the center of the Armenian Apostolic Church. It is thus unofficially known in Western sources as a “holy city” and in Armenia as the country’s “spiritual capital”. It was one of the major cities and a capital of ancient Greater Armenia. Reduced to a small town by the early 20th century, it experienced large expansion during the Soviet period becoming, effectively, a suburb of Yerevan. Its population stands just over 37,000 based on 2016 estimates.

Garni

The settlement has an ancient history and is best known for the Hellenistic Garni temple. The area was first occupied in the 3rd millennium BC along easily defensible terrain at one of the bends of the Azat River. Garni is notable for its fortress complex with the 1st-century AD Garni Temple, Surb Astvatsatsin Church, Mashtots Hayrapet Church, a ruined 4th-century single-aisle church, a ruined Tukh Manuk Shrine, Saint Sargis Shrine, and a Queen Katranide Shrine.
Nearby is the Garni Gorge with well-preserved basalt columns, carved out by the Goght River. This portion of the gorge is typically referred to as the “Symphony of the Stones”. It is most easily reached via a road that leads left down the gorge just before reaching the temple of Garni. Another road leads to the gorge through the village, down a cobblestone road, and into the valley.

Dilijan

Dilijan is a town in northern Armenia. It’s known for spa resorts and traditional craft workshops. The town is surrounded by the forests of Dilijan National Park. The Geological Museum and Art Gallery displays archaeological finds and international art. North of town, Haghartsin Monastery is a complex of stone churches. East, Goshavank Monastery is known for its intricate khachkars, or carved stones.

Tsaghkadzor

Scenic downhill ride from the Mount Teghenis on the Tsaghkadzor ropeway. The Tsaghkadzor in the summer is a must visit! (Kotayk Province, Armenia)
Tsaghkadzor (“The Gorge of Flowers” in Armenian) is a spa town and a popular ski resort in Armenia, situated only 50 kms north of the capital Yerevan in the Kotayk Province. Surrounded with alpine meadows, the town is located on the southeastern slope of Mount Teghenis, at a height of 1,841 meters above sea level (which is 10 meters below the highest ski station of French resort Courchevel).
Tsaghkadzor is surrounded by the Tsakhkunyats mountain range from the west, and the town of Hrazdan from the east.

Tatev

Discover a whole new world of magical ambiance at Tatev Monastery in Armenia.
Sitting next to stunning mountains, Tatev Monastery was built in the ninth century.
Tatev Monastery once controlled a great deal of land and people in feudal times.
The region’s best school was built at Tatev Monastery in the tenth century.
It became an epicenter for scholars and the arts over the centuries.
Tatev Monastery has diverse historical significance paired with spectacular architectural and natural beauty.

Zvartnots

Zvartnots is a town located in the Armenian province of Armavir, about 10 km west from Yerevan, approximately half way to Ejmiatsin. Zvartnots International Airport, Yerevan’s international airport, is located near the town of Zvartnots, as is the Zvartnots Cathedral. The former national airline, Armavia, had its corporate headquarters on the grounds of Zvartnots International Airport. In addition, the head office of the General Department of Civil Aviation of Armenia is at Zvartnots Airport.

Haghpat

Haghpat is a village in the Lori Province of Armenia, located near the city of Alaverdi and the state border with Georgia. It is notable for Haghpat Monastery, a religious complex founded in the 10th century and included in the UNESCO World Heritage List along with monasteries in nearby Sanahin. The monastery is a magnificent example of medieval Armenian architecture that has been attracting increasing numbers of tourists. Haghpat Monastery is listed among the UNESCO World Heritage List. The village lies on a dissected plateau, a large flat area dissected by deep “cracks” formed by rivers, including the river Debed. The villages of Sanahin and Akner, as well as a part of Alaverdi, lie in plain view on neighboring sections of the plateau, however a steep and long descent to and ascent from the river is required to travel to them.

Jermuk

Jermuk, is a mountain spa town and the centre of the urban community of Jermuk in Vayots Dzor Province at the south of Armenia, at a road distance of 53 km east of the provincial capital Yeghegnadzor. It was considered one of the popular destinations for medical tourism in the Soviet Union. Jermuk is famous for its hot springs and mineral water brands bottled in the town. It is attractive for its fresh air, waterfall, artificial lakes, walking trails, the surrounding forests and mineral water pools. The town is being redeveloped to become a modern center of tourism and health services. It is also being set up to become a major chess center, with numerous chess international tournaments scheduled in the town. As per the 2016 official estimate, Jermuk had a population of around 3,400. However, as of the 2011 census, the population of Jermuk was 5,572. The nearby villages of Herher, Karmrashen, and Gndevaz are also part of the municipality of Jermuk.

Gyumri

Gyumri, is an urban municipal community and the second largest city in Armenia, serving as the administrative centre of Shirak Province in the northwestern part of the country. By the end of the 19th century, when the city was known as Alexandropol, it was one of the largest cities of Russian-ruled Eastern Armenia with a population similar to that of Yerevan. It was renamed to Leninakan during the Soviet period. The city’s population grew above 200,000 prior to the 1988 Spitak earthquake, when it was devastated. As of the 2011 census, the city had a population of 121,976, down from 150,917 reported at the 2001 census. Gyumri is the seat of the Diocese of Shirak of the Armenian Apostolic Church.

Goris

Goris is a town and the center of the urban community of Goris, in Syunik Province in the south of Armenia. Located in the valley of river Goris, it is 254 km from the Armenian capital Yerevan and 67 km from the provincial center Kapan. It is the Goris is the second-largest city in Syunik in terms of population. During the 2011 census, it had a population of 20,591, down from 23,261 reported at the 2001 census. However, as per the 2016 official estimate, the population of Goris was 20,300. Goris is the seat of the Diocese of Syunik of the Armenian Apostolic Church. Following the administrative reforms in 2016, the community of Goris was enlarged to include the surrounding villages of Akner, Bardzravan, Hartashen, Karahunj, Khndzoresk, Nerkin Khndzoresk, Shurnukh, Verishen, and Vorotan.

Geghard

While the main chapel was built in 1215, the monastery complex was founded in the 4th century by Gregory the Illuminator at the site of a sacred spring inside a cave. The monastery had thus been originally named Ayrivank, meaning “the Monastery of the Cave”. The name commonly used for the monastery today, Geghard, or more fully Geghardavank, meaning “the Monastery of the Spear”, originates from the spear which had wounded Jesus at the Crucifixion, allegedly brought to Armenia by Apostle Jude, called here Thaddeus, and stored amongst many other relics. Now it is displayed in the Echmiadzin treasury.

Sardarabad

Sardarabad Memorial is a symbol of pride and survival, the Sardarabad Memorial marks the place of Armenia’s successful last-ditch effort to save the nation from obliteration at the hands of the Turks in the Battle of Sardarabad on May 22–26, 1918. Against tremendous odds, and during the haunting backdrop of genocide during the previous few years, Armenia’s makeshift army rebuffed the Turkish troops and safeguarded the small portion of historic Armenia, what became the current republic as it stands today. On the grounds of the historic battle, one can today visit the Sardarabad Ethnography and Liberation Movement History Museum adjacent to the outdoor monument.

Khor Virap

Khor Virap’s notability as a monastery and pilgrimage site is attributed to the fact that Gregory the Illuminator was initially imprisoned here for 13 years by King Tiridates III of Armenia. Saint Gregory subsequently became the king’s religious mentor, and they led the proselytizing activity in the country. In the year 301, Armenia was the first country in the world to be declared a Christian nation. A chapel was initially built in 642 at the site of Khor Virap by Nerses III the Builder as a mark of veneration to Saint Gregory. Over the centuries, it was repeatedly rebuilt. In 1662, the larger chapel known as the “St. Astvatsatsin” (Holy Mother of God) was built around the ruins of the old chapel, the monastery, the refectory and the cells of the monks. Now, regular church services are held in this church. It is one of the most visited pilgrimage sites in Armenia.

Noravank

Noravank is a 13th-century Armenian monastery, located 122 km from Yerevan in a narrow gorge made by the Amaghu River, near the town of Yeghegnadzor, Armenia. The gorge is known for its tall, sheer, brick-red cliffs, directly across from the monastery. The monastery is best known for its two-story Surb Astvatsatsin (Holy Mother of God) church, which grants access to the second floor by way of a narrow stone-made staircase jutting out from the face of the building.
The monastery is sometimes called Noravank at Amaghu, with Amaghu being the name of a small and nowadays abandoned village above the canyon, in order to distinguish it from Bgheno-Noravank, near Goris. In the 13th–14th centuries the monastery became a residence of Syunik’s bishops and, consequently. a major religious and, later, cultural center of Armenia closely connected with many of the local seats of learning, especially with Gladzor’s famed university and library.

Areni

Areni is a village in the Vayots Dzor Province of Armenia. It is best known for its wine production, although the majority of wine produced locally is from the nearby village of Getap. The church of S. Astvatsatsin is a single-nave two-aisled domed Armenian church completed in the year 1321 and is located atop a plateau overlooking the Arpa River and Areni. It was designed by the architect and sculptor Momik who is best known for his high-relief carvings at the monastery of Noravank. Nearby are also the 13th-century ruins of lord Tarsaitch Orbelian of Syunik’s palace, moved from Yeghegis to Areni during that time. Ruins of a 13th-century bridge built by Bishop Sarkis in 1265-1287 are one kilometer northeast of the church. At the same location are the remains of an older bridge.

Areni Wine Factory